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Two things: 1. For someone new to Linux who is accustomed to Windows, what's the best way to start getting familiar with it. Either a linux install on a standalone machine or a good version to use on VM to learn it. I got a copy of Zorin 11, is that a good version to start out in a familiar environment and learn as you go? Is there any guide that gives a side by side comparison, so you can understand what's closest to the Linux equivalent of what you're familiar with in Windows? (device manager, updating, etc). 2. For machines that you can't get away from Windows on just yet (setting up machines for friends or family, gaming rig, etc), how best to manage privacy? To start with, use either 7 or 8.1 (no 10) and remove the telemetry updates? After that, any preferred apps to use and to stay away from (eg using Firefox not Chrome)?

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Linux user here. I would say get Ubuntu, it's friendly and familiar enough for a beginner but as soon as you feel comfy you can do interesting things with it. Disregard the naysayers, for beginners Ubuntu is ideal for the massive support it has not only for HW, but for every app you may imagine. Start with a live CD (athough I would choose to use a pendrive to make it faster) and try to actually use it for things. eventually you will want to do a dual boot. Welcome to linux, chum.

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>>3780 >>3781 Agree, use Ubuntu or Mint first, or forever. More popular OS = more support, easy to find bug fixes online if something ever crashes. Linux only has one thing that is weird compared to windows: the folder structure. In windows you have like /programs/someprogram/all files in here. On linux you'll have /usr/share/programStuff and /etc/var/moreprogramstuff. Linux separates everything into different folders, but because of that it does not get slower overtime like windows does with its registry. With linux, you are only supposed to use your /home folder really, unless you are changing stuff

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>>3782 and then use a windows virtual machine, dual boot when you must

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>>3782 >Linux only has one thing that is weird compared to windows: the folder structure Umm, I'd rather call Windows' folder structure "weird". Sure Linux isn't perfect, but in comparison Windows is just a random heap of garbage with stuff littered everywhere

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>>3784 It's irrelevant, it'll be weird from the other OS perspective. Now, to >>3780: Dude, in Linux there's no c:\ or d:\ or any letter, linux mounts the file system in a folder as if it were any other folder. Same with network directories (network mounts), or USBs, etc. Even the devices are folders. But you don't need to worry about it, from the interface you just use the things. That's the beauty of Ubuntu (I don't know Mint but it's held high in concept so I presume is great too), you can get elbows deep into the intricacies of the OS or just use everything from the interface. Just one thing: Windows uses a special administrator user. Everything is done by admin. Which leave gigantic holes were attacks comes from. Linux has an admin called root. Never EVER use root regularly, use your own user (which is defined when you use/install Linux), that has limited permissions, that's good from a security point of view, and also for yourself, as your normal user you can't, for example, delete important system directories. In Linux, SYSTEM32 deletes you.

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Zorin is good, so is Ubuntu (or Xubuntu). Learn how to use info(1) to learn more. Get to know the GNU core utils. Learn how to write small programs (like loops for renaming). Get to know cryptsetup(1) for security. Join the Linux community. linuxquestions.org is a good place to start. I'm using Linux Mint at the moment and it's as intuitive as you might want. Most distributions these days are. (Zorin among them.)

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>>4154 >Outlander >replying to a year old thread I like xubuntu, its my first dive into linux. I dual booted my win vista laptop with it a year ago. I only use windows because I can't get the dual display to work on xubuntu 14.04. I've been thinking of getting a ssd for my 7yo laptop and trying ver 16.04

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Ubuntu and its forks are ass. They are not worst than Windows but they are not trustful at all. Hardened Gentoo & OpenBSD are really secure, all the people should be using them. Other distros to study are Alpine, Qubes & OpenIndiana. Most of the secure distros aren't begginer-friendly, but you will learn a lot.




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